Office: 639 Salk

Phone: 412-648-1982

Fax: (412) 624-1850

Email: olufunmilola.abraham@pitt.edu

URL: www.pages.pharmacy.pitt.edu/abraham/

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Olufunmilola Abraham, BPharm, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics School of Pharmacy and the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI), University of Pittsburgh. She received her Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm) degree from University of Lagos, Nigeria. Dr. Abraham received her MS and PhD in Social and Administrative Sciences in Pharmacy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Pharmacy and a PhD minor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, focused on Human Factors Engineering and Patient Safety. She is a health services researcher whose program of research aims to enhance medication adherence, patient safety and quality of care for vulnerable populations in the community. Her research centers on utilizing human factors and systems engineering approaches to design interventions that improve patient care in a variety of community settings such as pharmacies, primary care clinics, faith-based organizations, and community centers. She partners with health care professionals in these settings to understand processes and technologies that impact medication safety, quality of care, and adherence to medications. She has been the principal investigator on several projects funded by the Community Pharmacy Foundation, the University of Pittsburgh CTSI, the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association, and AcademyHealth. Dr. Abraham teaching and research interests revolve around three main areas: (1) enhancing pharmacists' understanding of the impact of health information technology on patient care, adherence, and medication safety; (2) equipping students with the skills to apply human factors and systems engineering concepts and techniques in health services research; and (3) providing pharmacists and students with tools and skills needed to care for vulnerable patient populations in the community such as children, adolescents, and older adults.