PGY-2 Cardiology


The PGY2 cardiology residency program at UPMC is focused in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy, clinical research, and academia. The program is designed to increase the resident’s knowledge, skills, attitudes, and abilities in medication therapy management and clinical and academic leadership. Graduates of the residency program are prepared to assume any of the following roles:

  • Cardiology and/or critical care medicine care provider

  • Clinical Educator

  • Clinical Researcher

Each resident’s schedule is determined based on the program requirements and each resident’s specific goals. An individualized plan, including baseline assessment, is designed for each resident at the beginning of the year and used as an assessment tool throughout the year. The resident’s schedule consists of core and elective rotations, professional meetings, and vacation. The resident, preceptor team, and RPD will develop the sequence of rotations. Each concentrated rotation will be at least 4 weeks long. Additionally, all residents are required to be the primary preceptor for at least one advanced pharmacy practice experiential (APPE) learning rotation for fourth year Pharm.D. students at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy. All residents are also required to complete the University of Pittsburgh Mastery of Teaching Program.

Residency Goals

  • Serve as an authoritative expert on the optimal use of medications used in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease
  • Optimize the outcomes of patients with acute and chronic cardiovascular disease in various settings through the expert provision of evidence-based, patient-centered medication therapy as an integral part of an interdisciplinary team.
  • Demonstrate leadership and practice management skills
  • Manage and improve the medication-use process for patients with or at risk for cardiovascular disease
  • Contribute to the body of cardiovascular pharmacotherapy knowledge
  • Demonstrate excellence in the provision of training and educational activities for health care professionals, health care professionals in training, and the public.
  • Participate in the management of medical emergencies
  • Demonstrate skills required to function in an academic setting
  • Conduct outcomes research
  • Demonstrate additional skills for managing and improving the medication-use process for patients with cardiovascular diseases
  • Demonstrate additional skills for serving as an authoritative resource on the optimal use of medications used in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease
  • Demonstrate additional training and educational skill

Application Requirements

All residents must be eligible for pharmacist licensure in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Applications for Pharmacist License and Intern Registration are available.

Pennsylvania requires 1500 registered intern hours in order to be eligible for licensure. Of the 1500 hours, only 1000 hours can be obtained through an academic program. That is, 500 intern hours must be obtained outside of school. These 1500 intern hours must be registered with a state board of pharmacy to count toward licensure in Pennsylvania. If you have not yet started registering hours with your state board of parmacy, we encourage you to do so as soon as possible in order to be eligible for Pennsylvania licensure. We also encourage you to review your own state's rules regarding the registration, reporting and transfer of intern hours. Please do not hesitate to discuss any questions you have regarding licensure with individual program directors.

Application Process

Eligible candidates will have completed an ASHP accredited PGY1 pharmacy residency program and must submit the standard application requirements via PhORCAS by December 31st. An on-site interview is required.

This residency site agrees that no person at this site will solicit, accept, or use any ranking related information from any residency candidate.

To prepare pharmacists to assume any of the following roles:

  • Cardiology and/or Critical Care Medicine Care Provider

  • Clinical Educator

  • Clinical Researcher

Our residency graduates exit equipped to be fully integrated members of the interdisciplinary cardiovascular team, able to make complex pharmacotherapy recommendations in this fast-paced environment. Training focuses on developing resident capability to deal with range of diseases and disorders that occur in the cardiovascular population.

Graduates are experienced in short-term research in cardiology environment and excel in their ability to teach other health professionals and those in training to be health professionals. They also acquire the experience necessary to exercise leadership for this focus in the health system. A strength of our program and a significant focus is on academic pharmacy practice.

Duration: 12 months
Number Positions: 1
Starting Date: July 1
Salary: $ 46,000

Benefits: Health, dental, eye care, life, and disability available, Vacation and professional travel provided, Travel stipend available
Training Site Type: Hospital
Owner/Affiliates: Private
Model (type): Teaching, Tertiary
Professional Staff: 48
Total Beds: 1093

Required Learning Experiences

  • Cardiac ICU (CICU) – 2 months
  • Precepting - CICU – 1 month
  • Cardiothoracic ICU (CTICU) – 1 month
  • Advanced Heart Failure – 1 month
  • Cardiology Pavilion/Teaching Service – 1 month
  • Clinical Outcomes/Research – 1 month
  • Academic Pharmacy – 1 month
  • Electives – 3 months
  • Orientation to Hospital Operations – 1 month

Electives may include a learning experience not required (e.g., heart transplantation, emergency medicine, medical ICU, surgical/trauma ICU, internal medicine, etc.) or can be a repeat of a required experience where the resident demonstrates a specific interest.

Required Longitudinal Learning Experiences

  • Cardiology Clinics
  • Mastery of Teaching Program
  • Outcomes Research Project
  • Formulary Development
  • Anticoagulation Committee
  • Pharmacogenomics

Schwier NC, Coons JC, Rao SK. Pharmacotherapy update of acute idiopathic pericarditis. Pharmacotherapy 2015;35(1):99-111.

Verlinden NV, Coons JC. Disopyramide for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a pragmatic reappraisal of an old drug. Pharmacotherapy 2015. In Press.

Harris JR*, Coons JC. Ticagrelor use in a patient with a documented clopidogrel hypersensitivity. Ann Pharmacother 2014;48(9):1230-33.

Coons JC, Miller T*. Strategies to reduce bleeding risk in acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention: new and emerging pharmacotherapeutic considerations. Pharmacotherapy 2014;34(9):973-90.

Coons JC, Schwier N*, Harris J*, Seybert AL. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of prasugrel for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2014;10(4):609-20.

Abel EE*, Kane-Gill SL, Seybert AL, Kellum JK. A clinical outcomes comparison between direct thrombin inhibitors for the management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in patients receiving renal replacement therapy. Am J Health Syst Pharm 2012;69(18):1559-67.

Gokhman R*, Seybert AL, Phrampus P, Darby J, Kane-Gill SL. Medication errors during medical emergencies in a large, tertiary care, academic medical center. Resuscitation 2012;83(4):482-7.

Devabhakthuni S* and Seybert AL. Oral Antiplatelet Therapy for the Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes: Defining the Role of Prasugrel. Crit Care Nurse 2011;31(1):51-63.

Gokhman R*, Smithburger PL*, Kane-Gill SL, Seybert AL. Pharmacokinetic rationale for combination therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2010;56:686-695.

Zerumsky (Watson) K*, Seybert AL, Saul MI, Lee JS, Kane-Gill SL. Bivalirudin versus unfractionated heparin in percutaneous coronary intervention: determining outcomes and glycoprotein inhibitor use. Pharmacotherapy 2007;27(5):647-656.

Seybert AL, Coons JC, Zerumsky K*. Treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: Is there a role for bivalirudin? Pharmacotherapy 2006;26(2):229-41.

Coons JC*, Seybert AL, Saul MI, Kirisci L, Kane-Gill SL. Outcomes and costs of abciximab versus eptifibatide for percutaneous coronary intervention. Ann Pharmacother 2005;39(10):1621-6.

Verlinden NV*, Coons JC. Disopyramide for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a pragmatic reappraisal of an old drug. Pharmacotherapy 2015;35(12):1164-72.o Schwier NC*, Coons JC, Rao SK. Pharmacotherapy update of acute idiopathic pericarditis. Pharmacotherapy 2015;35(1):99-111.

Grant Total: $5,000. "Clinical Outcomes Comparison of Direct Thrombin Inhibitors for the Management of Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis." ASHP Foundation for the New Practitioners Resident Practice-Based Research Grant Program, 2008, Residency Director and Research Mentor

2008 Residency Preceptor of the Year - Amy Seybert
University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy

2009 Pharmacy Residency Excellence Preceptor Award - Amy Seybert
ASHP Research and Education Foundation

Program Director

James Coons, PharmD, BCPS (AQ-Cardiology) 
Associate Professor
727 Salk Hall
3501 Terrace Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15261
Phone: 412-648-3088 
FAX: 412-648-8175
coonsjc@upmc.edu

UPMC Presbyterian